Ich sah am Montag bereits zum zweiten Mal ‘The Avengers’. Am beeindruckendsten fand ich neben den Dialogen den Endkampf in Manhattan, bei dem Hochhäuser umstürzen und generell viel in die Luft fliegt. Eine Frage, die ich mir direkt nach dem Verlassen des Kinosaals stellte: Wer räumt eigentlich den ganzen Müll da jetzt weg? Und wer bezahlt dafür? Ich bin da nicht alleine, denn Chuck Watson und Sara Jupin, zwei Menschen, die da wesentlich mehr Ahnung von haben als ich, machten sich auch Gedanken:

Although many buildings in the fight’s East Midtown arena suffered extensive structural damage, most were limited to the more superficial destruction of windows, facade and some interiors. Those buildings that had their tops crushed, though, would be especially costly and time-consuming to fix, as would be Grand Central Station, through which a warship crashed.

“The extensive damage to Grand Central Terminal could prove highly disruptive, depending on the subsurface damage to the subway system,” KAC notes. “Although such damage is unlikely, as the 9/11 events showed, collapsing buildings can cause significant damage to subsurface infrastructure such as gas, communications and electrical systems. Detailed site surveys will be required to assess the state of the subterranean infrastructure.”

KAC also predicts that liability would be a major issue. Who, exactly, will have to pay for the damage? S.H.I.E.L.D., they note, is likely protected as a government agency, though probes eventually will look into its role in predicting, preventing and responding to the invasion — just as they looked into the Ghostbusters.

via Hollywood Reporter